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Verbal isolation

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Verbal Isolation


Verbal isolation that is concentration producing the vajra speech

The nature of the second stage in the sixfold division of the completion stage of the Ārya system is “the completion-stage practice that begins from the generation of the pristine wisdom of [white] appearance derived from causing the upper and lower winds to enter, abide, and dissolve in the central channel at the heart due to a yogi of this system meditating on a mantra drop at the point of the heart. It extends up to but not including the generation of the pristine wisdom of [white] appearance derived from causing the winds to enter, abide, and dissolve in the indestructible drop at the heart due to meditation that completely releases the channel knots at the heart.”

The definition of the vajra speech of verbal isolation is given by delineating when it begins and ends.255 A yogi who has meditated on physical isolation places his attention on the point of the heart that is at the center of the heart cakra and focuses on a mantra drop, a drop containing mantric syllables. Through meditating on the mantra drop he causes the winds from the upper and lower parts of his body to gather at his heart. Then he causes these winds to

properly enter, abide, and dissolve in the central channel at his heart, thereby generating the pristine wisdom of white appearance. This marks the beginning of verbal isolation that continues up until, but not including, the capacity to cause the proper entry, abidance, and dissolution of the winds in the indestructible drop at the heart that gives rise to the pristine wisdom of white appearance. A yogi cannot accomplish this until he has completely released the channel knots at the heart; when that point is reached, he transfers to the next level.

In terms of the coarse and subtle bodies, while the coarse physical elements are classified as the coarse body, speech is classified as the subtle body, since the root of speech is wind. The practice of verbal isolation depends on the principle that mind and its supporting wind necessarily exist in the same location. Therefore, when the mind focuses on the central channel at the center of the heart, the wind that supports it is also established there.


Vitality exertion and vajra recitation Calling this level verbal isolation or vajra recitation is misleading because it includes three yogas of vitality exertion, and neither the yoga of vitality exertion meditating on the mantra drop nor the substance drop are either verbal isolation or vajra recitation. The level of verbal isolation or vajra recitation includes the three practices of vitality exertion:256 (1) meditation on the light drop257 at the base of the nose, between the eyebrows at the upper opening of the central channel, (2) meditation on the mantra drop258 at the center of the heart, and (3) meditation on the substance drop259 at the tip of secret place. However, since only the yoga of the light drop is actual verbal isolation and vajra recitation, it is misleading to call all three yogas verbal isolation or vajra recitation.


Illuminating Lamp states:


Calling this verbal isolation or vajra recitation is misleading for the general name for this level in the Later Guhyasamāja Tantra is vitality exertion, the third of the six levels.

The author here quotes a passage from Tsongkhapa’s Illuminating Lamp that refers to this misleading name. One says: Take both meditation on the mantra drop and meditation on the substance drop—they are neither verbal isolation nor vajra recitation because verbal isolation or vajra recitation must be yogas of vitality exertion meditating on the light drop at the base of the nose. Now the author presents a debate to clarify the nature of the yogas of vitality exertion that meditate on, respectively, the mantra drop at the center of the heart and the substance drop at the tip of the secret organ. The proponent in this debate asserts that neither is verbal isolation or vajra recitation because verbal isolation must be the yoga of vitality exertion meditating on the light drop at the upper end of the central channel.


The basis of verbal isolation


For the speech that is the basis for achieving isolation is the winds arising, entering, and abiding in natural recitation.

It is important to identify the basis for achieving isolation in verbal isolation just as it is in physical isolation. In physical isolation it is the coarse elements of the body that appear and are conceived as ordinary. In verbal isolation the basis upon which isolation is established is the three phases or actions of the winds arising, entering, and abiding at specific locations of the body.

And the object of negation that one is to be isolated from is conceiving those three winds to be different from the tones of the three letters. And the purpose of isolation is indivisibly uniting the three tones of the winds arising, entering, and abiding and the tones of the three letters. And this is done via vajra recitation.

In vajra recitation the three syllables refer to oṃ, āḥ, and hūṃ. The tone of the syllable hūṃ corresponds to the winds arising, where the term arising indicates that the winds leave their usual location or seat and begin to move to a different location. The tone of the syllable oṃ corresponds to the winds “entering,” or returning after moving. The tone of the syllable āḥ corresponds to the winds temporarily abiding in a specific location without moving. Therefore the tone of the syllables hūṃ, oṃ, and āḥ correspond to the winds arising, entering, and abiding.

Vajra recitation also means repetition and the act of reproducing. Therefore in mantra recitation the sound of the mantra is repeated, or reproduced, continuously. Breathing is also a rhythmic movement of wind with three repeated phases: (1) the exhalation of wind from the nostrils, (2) the inhalation of wind, (3) a short period where the wind abides before it is again exhaled. Vajra recitation is the natural, uncontrived occurrence of the rising, entering, and abiding of the winds. The word vajra in vajra recitation conveys not only the meaning of something that cannot be destroyed by others but also something that exists naturally, from the beginning.

If we meditate on seeing the rising, entering, and abiding of the winds to be indivisible from the tone or vibration of the letters hūṃ, oṃ, and āḥ, in due course we will see that each of the winds possesses that specific nature. Then whenever the winds arise, enter, or abide in a specific location, they do so with the sound of the relevant syllable. Moreover this process blesses the winds as they rise, enter, and abide in specific locations, since these three syllables are the essence of the mantras of all deities and they carry the blessings of vajra body, vajra speech, and vajra mind.

The three phases of the winds entering, remaining, exiting, and then reentering, remaining, reexiting, and so forth occurs naturally and continuously, without any specific effort. The practitioner comprehends this natural repetition of the phases of winds to be indivisible from the nature of the deity. The deity as well as the mantra syllables have the nature of pristine wisdom realizing emptiness. For example the tone of the winds arising is visualized as pristine wisdom

realizing emptiness manifesting in the aspect of the sound hūṃ. Similarly the tone of the winds entering is visualized as pristine wisdom realizing emptiness manifesting in the aspect of the sound oṃ, and the tone of the winds abiding is visualized as pristine wisdom realizing emptiness manifesting as the sound āḥ. This is how the practice of verbal isolation isolates the practitioner from the conception that sound and recitation are ordinary. In this process we meditate on many objects that possess the same nature. This is similar to the offerings described in the Guru Pūjā that possess different aspects while in essence they are pristine wisdom realizing emptiness and possess the function of generating bliss through the senses.


Illuminating Lamp states:


The recitation that is by nature the indivisible union [20a] of the three letters of the three vajras and the three tones of the three phases of the winds is called vajra recitation.

This passage from Illuminating Lamp supports the author’s view. Moreover we may adjust the order of the phases of the winds to match the syllables. Therefore if we prefer the order of the syllables as oṃ aḥ hūṃ, then we contemplate the phases of the winds as entering, abiding, and arising.


Debate on vitality exertion and vajra recitation


One says: It follows that this type of explanation is unacceptable because the three yogas of vitality exertion explained in the Later Guhyasamāja Tantra are included in the level of vajra-recitation verbal isolation.

Reply: That is not logically necessary because that included in the level of vajra-recitation verbal isolation does not have to be actual verbal recitation. The author agrees with the statement of the Later Guhyasamāja Tantra that the three yogas of vitality exertion are included in vajra-recitation verbal isolation but disagrees that it disqualifies this mode of explanation, since what is included within vajra recitation does not have to be actual vajra recitation.


Later Guhyasamāja Tantra states:


There are three yogas of vitality exertion meditating on the three points explained in Bright Lamp. Two yogas are vitality exertion but not actual verbal isolation and vajra recitation. However, they are named after the main practice of vitality exertion since that includes both.

Later Guhyasamāja Tantra states that there are three yogas of vitality exertion and these are explained in Candrakīrti’s commentary to the Root Tantra of Guhyasamāja called Bright Lamp. The three yogas referred to are (1) yoga meditating on alight drop at the upper opening of the central channel, (2) yoga meditating on the mantra drop at the center of the heart cakra, and (3) yoga meditating on a substance drop at the tip of the jewel. Only the yoga of the light drop is fully qualified vajra-recitation verbal isolation, and in that sense it is considered to be the main practice among the three. The other two yogas of the mantra and substance drop are not actual vajra-recitation verbal isolation, but they are still classified as verbal isolation.

One says: It follows that the yoga of vitality exertion is not necessarily vajra-recitation verbal isolation because Tathāgathavajra explains that all yogas that gather the winds into the central channel by meditating on letters, drops, and so on at important points at the body are vitality exertion. Likewise, Rinpoché explains that all meditation on the letters and drops at the cakras are methods for gathering the winds in the central channel and extensively praises this amazing, excellent explanation of vitality exertion.

The Indian scholar Tathāgatavajra states that there are many types of vitality exertion, since any yoga that focuses on a subtle drop or syllable placed at the cakras formed by the central, right, and left channel and gathers the winds into the central channel is referred to as vitality exertion. 264 Therefore the term vitality exertion refers not only to the actual, main practice of verbal isolation but to a broad range of similar secondary yogas. This mode of presentation is praised as very skillful.


The different levels of practice of vitality exertion


There are different levels of meditation in the three vitality exertions. During physical isolation you meditate on the mantra drop at the point of the heart to gather the winds in the central channel, though you cannot gather the winds in the central channel at the heart. Then through cultivating that for a long time you first generate pristine wisdom of the four empties and then progress to the level of vitality exertion called vajra-recitation verbal isolation. Since this state precedes mental isolation, [20b] it is not actual mental isolation even though it may be called mental isolation.

There are three types of dissolution of winds related to the central channel. First, it is possible that winds dissolve in the channels contiguous to the central channel. Such dissolution may induce experiences similar to the dissolution of winds in the central channel, but practitioners should be able to differentiate them. Second, it is possible that the winds dissolve in the central channel in general, and third, it is possible that they dissolve in the central channel at the heart. From among these three types of wind dissolution, the last is the most difficult to achieve. Again a practitioner should be able to distinguish between winds dissolving in the central channel in general and dissolving in the central channel at the heart.


The mantra and light drops


During physical isolation practitioners engage in meditation on the mantra drop to gather the winds in the central channel. And though this practice involves focusing on a drop at the center of the heart cakra,they are merely able to dissolve the winds in the central channel in general and not specifically at the heart. As practitioners develop greater familiarity with this yoga, they generate pristine wisdom of the four empties and then transfer to the yoga of vitality exertion at the level of verbal isolation. Such vitality-exertion yoga is also designated as “mental isolation,” although it is not actual mental isolation. The reason establishing this is given by Rinpoché in his Illuminating Lamp.


Illuminating Lamp states:


Through properly understanding the point of meditating on the indestructible dropat the heart and cultivating such meditation for a long time, you first generate the pristine wisdom of the four empties. Since this state precedes mental isolation, it is not actual mental isolation though it may be called that.

Thus gathering and dissolving the winds in the central channel through meditating on the mantra drop as the means of gathering the winds at the heart is dissolution of the winds in the central channel near the indestructible drop at the heart, but it is not dissolution of winds in the actual indestructible drop. To dissolve the winds in the actual indestructible drop you must loosen the channel knots there. To do that you meditate on vajra recitation indivisibly uniting the tone of the three phases of the winds arising, entering, and abiding with the tone of the three letters, in other words vitality exertion meditating on the light drop at the tip of the upper opening of the forehead.

When discussing the dissolution of the winds in the central channel at the heart, we must distinguish between dissolving the winds in the central channel and dissolving them in the indestructible drop at the core of the central channel. Causing the winds to dissolve in the actual indestructible drop relies on loosening the channel knots at the heart through engaging in vajra recitation that unites the tone of the letters hūṃ, oṃ, and āḥ with the tone of the winds arising, entering, and abiding. Vajra recitation is performed while we focus on the light drop at the upper opening of the central channel.

You clear the channel knots by inserting winds into them, just as you clear a blocked hollow bamboo stem by inserting a long stick into it . This meditation for loosening the knots that block the central channel is likened to inserting a long stick into a blocked bamboo stem. Although the inside of a bamboo stem is largely hollow, solid membranes at the joints divide the stem into separate sections and prevent the flow of air through the stem. Inserting a long stick into the stem pierces the membranes, permitting the unobstructed flow of air. So, too, by meditating on the light drop at the upper opening of the central channel, we loosen the knots blocking the upper part of the central channel, gradually permitting the unobstructed flow of wind down the central channel to the heart.


Three misconceptions regarding indivisibility with the three syllables

Though wind and mantra are indivisibly united, the tones of the three phases of the wind arising, entering, and abiding are not to be taken as the same as (1) the three written letters, (2) external speech expressed as words, or (3) the external tones visualized as the expression of words when not expressed as words. It has been explained that winds arising from their seats to flow to other locations is indivisible from the tone of the syllable hūṃ, winds entering their normal seats from other locations is indivisible from the tone of the syllable oṃ, and winds abiding in their normal seats is indivisible from the tone of the syllable āḥ. But how is this indivisibility to be understood? The text presents three assertions regarding such indivisibility that should be rejected as mistaken.

(1) The first mistaken position is to think that the syllables hūṃ, oṃ, and āḥ should be visualized as written on their respective seats when the winds arise, enter, and abide there.

(2) The second mistaken position is to take the arising, entering, and abiding of the winds to be indivisible from the external, verbal pronunciation of the syllables hūṃ, oṃ, and āḥ.

(3) The third mistaken position is to take the tone to be indivisible from the mental recitation of the three syllables. Thus the resonance of the three phases of the flow of winds should not be identified with the form of the letters nor with their verbal or mental recitation.

Having defined three positions that should be rejected as mistaken, the author then explains the actual meaning of vajra recitation.

The method of vajra recitation in this context is to recognize that when winds move in the channels, their resonance is like the tones of the three syllables, and to direct the mind without distraction to just that.

The actual meaning of vajra recitation refers to single-pointed concentration that comprehends the sound that resonates when the winds flow in the channels to be similar to the tones of the syllables hūṃ, oṃ, āḥ.


Classifications of vajra recitation


Having explained the nature of vajra recitation, the author then presents the different types of vajra recitation from the perspective of the winds involved, the syllables involved, and the state we seek to establish.

When vajra recitation as the object of recitation is classified by means of the winds, then there are two types—main and secondary vajra recitation—and these two have, respectively, four and five divisions.

Just as the winds may be classified as main and secondary winds, we may also classify vajra recitation as main and secondary vajra recitation. Moreover, main vajra recitation may be further classified in four from the perspective of the main winds utilized in vajra recitation, excluding the pervading wind. So, too, secondary vajra recitation may be classified in five from the perspective of the secondary winds utilized in vajra recitation. If they are classified by means of the mantra recited, [21a] then there are two, namely vajra recitation of the two letters hūṃ and ho, and vajra recitation of the three letters oṃ, āḥ, and hūṃ.

Vajra recitation may also be classified from the perspective of the mantra recited. The author has already made reference to vajra recitation utilizing the three syllables oṃ, āḥ, and hūṃ. But vajra recitation may also be accomplished on the basis of the two syllables hūṃ and ho. When studying verbal isolation it is useful to remember the meaning of the term mantra. In Sanskrit, man refers to “the mind” and tra refers to “that which protects,” and together they mean “that which protects the mind.” In this context mantra refers to protecting the mind from ordinary appearances and conceptions. Once the mind is protected in this way, it can be visualized as the deity.

In everyday life, forms appear to eye awareness, sounds appear to ear awareness, aromas appear to nose awareness, flavors appear to tongue awareness, tactile objects appear to body awareness, and finally the thought “ordinary objects appear to their relevant senses” appears to mental awareness. Yet the mind should be protected from such ordinary appearances and conceptions. Instead of thinking, “an ordinary form appeared to my eye awareness,” the practitioner should think, “the deity appeared to my eye awareness” and so forth. The mind is therefore protected by substituting ordinary appearances and conceptions with divine

appearances and conceptions. This constitutes the definitive meaning of mantra, while the actual syllables oṃ, āḥ, hūṃ, and so forth constitute the interpretive meaning of mantra. In other words the definitive meaning of mantra is pristine wisdom realizing emptiness, and this pristine wisdom manifests as the tones of the syllables oṃ, āḥ, and hūṃ.

There are three occasions when completion stage practitioners perform vajra recitation, for it is said that (1) they perform vajra recitation to establish the feats of pacification, increase, power, or wrath, through utilizing the four main winds,

If a practitioner of the completion stage seeks to establish the four feats, he will achieve them by relying on the four main winds269 but not on the pervading wind.

(2) they perform vajra recitation to establish the five higher perceptions of the eyes, ears, nose, tongue, and body, through serially utilizing the five secondary winds—the moving wind and so forth,

Similarly, if a practitioner of the completion stage seeks to establish higher perception, he or she will achieve that by relying on the five secondary winds.271 Vajra recitation using the moving wind establishes higher perception related to the eyes. Vajra recitation using the fully moving wind establishes higher perception related to the ears. Vajra recitation using the correctly moving wind establishes higher perception related to the nose. Vajra recitation using the intensely moving wind establishes higher perception related to the tongue. And vajra recitation using the definitely moving wind establishes higher perception related to the body.

(3) they perform vajra recitation to establish the empties of mental isolation after first establishing physical isolation, through initially using the four main winds and then having attained mastery over them, using the five secondary winds. Another reason a completion-stage practitioner relies on vajra recitation is to establish pristine wisdom of the empties at the level of mental isolation. When this is the goal of our practice, we must first rely on the main winds; then later, when some experience has been gained, we rely on the secondary winds.272


The substance drop


Meditation on the substance drop at the tip of the secret organ has two types:

(1) retention of the drop of bodhicitta produced from the union of yourself and an action seal at the meeting point of both lower openings of the central channel, without releasing it, . . .

In the first type we practice with an actual action consort—an “action seal” (karmamudrā)—by focusing on the drop of bodhicitta remaining at the point where the two sexual organs meet, without releasing it. The use of an actual consort indicates that the practitioner has already reached a high level of realization. . . . and

(2) meditation focusing on the drop at the meeting point of the two lower openings of the central channels of oneself and a wisdom seal. In the second case, the only difference is that we enter union with an imagined, wisdom consort, while the focal location and object remain the same.274 It is necessary to meditate in this way because if the two former types of vitality exertion cannot gather the winds in the central channel at the heart, then it is achieved by meditation on the substance drop, since this promotes the gathering of the winds at the heart.

If we cannot gather the winds in the heart by other types of meditation, meditation on the light and mantra drops may achieve this. Further, once the winds have been gathered in the heart, it is said that meditation on the substance drops is able to increase the strength and speed of that gathering. This explains why we need to meditate on the substance drop.

Vitality exertion where you are conjoined with either seal occurs twice, namely before and after the completion of vajra recitation. The method of gathering the winds in the central channel should be understood from Illuminating Lamp.

The practice of the substance drop involving union with an actual or visualized consort may be performed at different times, and here the author states that it may be practiced before or even after the completion of vajra recitation. Details on how this practice gathers the winds into the central channel may be found in Tsongkhapa’s Lamp Illuminating the Five Stages of Guhyasamāja Tantra.


Points of debate


Dissolution of winds at the heart


One says: To dissolve the winds at the heart you must loosen the channel knots at the heart.


Reply: That is unacceptable because dissolution of the winds at the heart occurs without dissolution of the winds in the central channel at the heart, for when the winds dissolve internally, it is not logically necessary that they dissolve in the central channel.

Here the author makes the distinction between the winds dissolving in the vicinity of the heart near the central channel and dissolving precisely in the central channel at the indestructible drop at the heart. The indestructible drop contains the extremely subtle wind and mind. To clarify the issue further the author quotes a passage from the Illuminating Lamp.

For as it says in Illuminating Lamp:

As explained earlier, [21b] when there are definite signs of the winds entering the central channel, and the winds abide internally for a long time by their own force, and if there is dissolution where the four empties appear as explained, then this occurs through dissolution of the winds in the central channel.276 There are times when the winds enter the heart, and there are times when they enter the central channel at the heart in particular. This second type of entry is accompanied by certain signs.277 Following that, the winds abide in the central channel and finally dissolve through their own force, naturally and without having been forced to do so in a contrived manner, and the four empties appear as described in the texts.

Though internal dissolution occurs at other times, on such occasions the empties do not arise as explained, since they do not involve dissolution in the central channel.

At other times, winds might enter the heart but not the central channel, and in such cases the four empties do not occur as described in the texts. In some cases the practitioner may cause the winds to enter the heart through his or her own intense effort and not through the winds entering the heart naturally by their own power. As a result the winds may enter the heart but they do not remain long; they exit the heart fairly quickly. Although such events may be described as “entry of the winds in the heart,” it is not fully qualified entry, and it is not accompanied by the usual signs of the dissolution of the elements and the appearance of the four empties.


Dissolution of winds in the central channel at the heart

One says: To dissolve the winds in the central channel at the heart you must loosen the channel knots at the heart because the winds cannot penetrate the central channel at the heart without the channel knots at the heart being loosened.


Reply: The reason is not established . . .

In other words, Ngawang Palden asserts that it is possible for the winds to enter the central channel at the heart even when the knots at the heart have not been loosened.

. . . because Illuminating Lamp states:

To dissolve the winds in the actual indestructible drop at the heart, you must loosen the channel knots at the heart. Prior to that, dissolution of winds in the central channel by means of gathering them at the heart is dissolution near to the central channel but not dissolution in it. Similarly, though you may insert the winds into the central channel, the winds cannot move from the central channel at the site of the channel knots.

The indestructible drop is the seat of the extremely subtle wind and mind that exist in the very core of the heart cakra. In order for the winds to enter the indestructible drop, the knots formed by the right and left channels at that level must be loosened. Prior to that the winds may gather in the heart, but they do not enter the indestructible drop; the winds may approach it but they do not enter it. Also at that time, although the winds might gather inside the central channel, they will not be able to flow inside the central channel due to the presence of restricting knots.


Dissolution of winds in the indestructible drop at the heart


One says: This method of explanation is unacceptable, because the explanation that “to dissolve the winds into the indestructible drop at the heart you must loosen the channel knots, and to dissolve the winds in the central channel at the heart you do not need to loosen the channel knots” is given from the perspective of the channel knot at the center of the heart, but to dissolve the winds in the central channel at the heart, you must loosen the channel knots above and below the heart . . .

The author raises a further distinction. Previously he mentioned the dissolution of winds in the vicinity of the central channel at the heart, and then dissolution of winds in the central channel at the heart. Still, even though the winds dissolve in the central channel at the heart, they do not necessarily dissolve in the indestructible drop at the heart. Such dissolution in the indestructible drop within the central channel at the heart is the most difficult type of dissolution.

. . . because the Grounds and Paths of Yangchen Galo states:

The channel knots above and below the heart are loosened in dependence on performing vajra recitation, where the individual tones of the three phases of the winds arising, entering, and abiding manifest as the tones of the three syllables, and when you generate the pristine wisdom of appearance from the dissolution of the upper and lower winds in the central channel at the heart, you shift from physical to verbal isolation.280 Reply: This should be analyzed...

The author does not offer a definitive answer on this point but rather suggests that this issue be investigated further.


Shifting from physical to verbal isolation

. . . because when shifting [22a] from physical isolation to the level of verbal isolation, you do not need to meditate on vajra recitation. This is because (1) vitality exertion meditating on the mantra drop must precede vajra recitation, and (2) you shift from physical isolation to the level of verbal isolation [when meditating on the mantra drop].

(1) The first part of the reason is established because the Third Chapter states:

Through stabilizing the precious state, there is progress. Through not stabilizing it, there is no progress.

Bright Lamp states this when explaining the meaning of “final” in the text.

This quotation is from the third chapter of the Root Tantra of Guhyasamāja. The “precious state” mentioned here refers to the practice of the mantra drop281 and “progress” refers to the entry, exit, and flow of winds that is natural with vajra recitation in general. This is also discussed in Candrakīrti’s Bright Lamp. Vajra recitation is a practice found in many levels, for it can be performed by beginners, by those on the generation stage, by those of the completion stage who have not yet established its final meaning, and finally, at its highest level, by practitioners of the completion stage. Other texts that may be quoted to support the reason that vitality exertion meditating on the mantra drop must precede vajra recitation are Rinpoché’s four interrelated commentaries on Guhyasamāja.

Here vajra recitation is explained to be “final” because Analysis of the Four Interrelated Commentaries on Guhyasamāja states: This vajra recitation is vajra recitation generating union, and therefore it is said to be final by means of function. Alternately, it is explained as final by considering just the performance of vajra recitation, which at the time of union is similar to that at the time of verbal isolation.

The first part of the reason is established with these two quotations. Moreover in the second quotation, the time of union is mentioned. There are two types of union, namely the union of a learner and the union of a non-learner. Learner union again has two types, namely (a) the union of abandonment and (b) the union of realization where union of abandonment is attained first. This passage therefore states that the function of vajra recitation is to generate union

irrespective of whether it is the first or second type. Alternatively, verbal recitation performed at the time of union is similar to verbal recitation performed at the time of verbal isolation. In other words, despite being practiced at different times and existing at different levels, vajra recitation itself is not union. Also final vajra recitation of the completion stage is not the ultimate state of union.

(2) The second part of the reason is established because the pristine wisdom of the four empties derived from penetrating the vital point at the heart at the time of physical isolation does not exist.

Here the author states that the practice of vitality exertion meditating on the mantra drop occurs prior to vajra recitation when we shift from physical isolation to the level of verbal isolation. The actual pristine wisdom of the empties may manifest when the winds penetrate the heart at the time of the three isolations. But if such fully qualified pristine wisdom of the empties arises, then we have already shifted from physical to verbal isolation because such an

experience does not exist in the context of physical isolation. When we shift from physical to verbal isolation, we do not need to engage in vajra recitation because prior to vajra recitation, we must meditate on the mantra drop, and it is at this time that we actually shift from physical to verbal isolation. Thus the point is established that shifting from physical to verbal isolation occurs prior to meditating on the actual vajra recitation. This is sufficient detail.

The author has presented the level of verbal isolation in sufficient detail, and from this point on he will continue with the presentation of the next level: mental isolation, the third type of isolation.



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