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The Seven Factors of Enlightenment (Bojjhanga Pabba)

From Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia
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 I. Sati-Sambojjhanga (mindfulness)

Sati-Sambojjhanga

Mindfulness is that which watches what is occuring at the present moment in the body and mind.
To see through the third eye the reality of the moment.

II. Dhammavicaya-Sambojjhanga (investigation of the Dhamma)

Dhammavicaya-Sambojjhanga

Investigation of phenomena.

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This is the wisdom or insight that can differentiate the corporal body and the mind and percieves both as imperanemt, unsatisfactory and not self.
Buddha nature
Us (student, practitioner)
Dharma (study of written word)

III. Viriya-Sambojjhanga (effort, energy)

Viriya-Sambojjhanga

This is the balanced mental effort that is generated while being mindful.
To see the impermanence of every thing and realise illusion.

IV. Piti-Sambojjhanga (explosive deep joy, happiness)

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Piti-Sambojjhanga

This is the interest and lack of boredom that arises due to seeing things as they really are.

It is often associated with a feeling of lightness, lifting of the body or a thrill of joy that can make hair on the body stand up.

V. Passadhi-Sambojjhanga (tranquility, calmness)

Passadhi-Sambojjhanga

With the arising of rapture, the mind becomes calm and peaceful.

This is called tranquility.
To have a cool mind

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stabilised when facing

extraordinary challenges (frightful or charming).

VI. Samadhi-Sambojjhanga (concentration)

Samadhi-Sambojjhanga

With the arising of tranquility, the mind is not distracted and no longer wanders here and there but is aware of each object that appears in the mind.

This is concentration.
Concentration:
To focus on one point,

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To gather all the power

of the thoughts in one

far behind the language expression.

To be one with

the inner mind without help

of reason.

VII. Upekkha-Sambojjhanga (equanimity)

Upekkha-Sambojjhanga

With the arising of concentration, the mind sees each object in a detached and calm way.

It feels neither aversion to pain nor is it overpowered by pleasure but it is calmly and effortlessly observant of the impermanence, unsatisfactoriness or soullnessness of every constituent of body and mind.

This is called equanimity.
Not indifference

Not fatalism

But to realise

The universal illusion

Product of our six senses (the brain too)

It is intuition of

The ultimate truth

Source

www.phathue.com/buddhism