Articles by alphabetic order
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 Ā Ī Ñ Ś Ū Ö Ō
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0


The Buddha's Passing Away

From Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
20ea z.jpg

Now at that time Subhadda the Wanderer was staying in Kusinara. He heard that 'Tonight, in the last watch of the night, the total Unbinding of Gotama the contemplative will take place.' Then this thought occurred to him, 'I have heard the elder wanderers, teachers of teachers, saying that only once in a long, long time do Tathagatasworthy ones, rightly self-awakened — appear in the World. Tonight, in the last watch of the night, the total Unbinding of Gotama the contemplative will take place. Now there is a Doubt that has arisen in me, but I have Faith that he could teach me the Dhamma in such a way that I might abandon that Doubt.'

So he went to the Mallan Sal Tree grove and, on arrival, said to Ven. Ananda, 'I have heard the elder wanderers, teachers of teachers, saying that only once in a long, long time do Tathagatasworthy ones, rightly self-awakened — appear in the World. Tonight, in the last watch of the night, the total Unbinding of Gotama the contemplative will take place. Now there is a Doubt that has arisen in me, but I have Faith that he could teach me the Dhamma in such a way that I might abandon that Doubt. It would be good, Ven. Ananda, if you would let me see him.'

When this was said, Ven. Ananda said to him, 'Enough, friend Subhadda. Do not bother the Blessed One. The Blessed One is tired.'

For a second time... For a third time, Subhadda the Wanderer said to Ven. Ananda, '...It would be good, Ven. Ananda, if you would let me see him.'

For a third time, Ven. Ananda said to him, 'Enough, friend Subhadda. Do not bother the Blessed One. The Blessed One is tired.'

Now, the Blessed One heard the exchange between Ven. Ananda and Subhadda the Wanderer, and so he said to Ven. Ananda, 'Enough, Ananda. Do not stand in his way. Let him see the Tathagata. Whatever he asks me will all be for the sake of Knowledge, and not to be bothersome. And whatever I answer when asked, he will quickly understand.'

So Ven. Ananda said to Subhadda the Wanderer, 'Go ahead, friend Subhadda. The Blessed One gives you his leave.'

Then Subhadda went to the Blessed One and exchanged courtesies, and after the exchange of courtesies sat to one side. As he was sitting there, he said to the Blessed One, 'Lord, these brahmans and contemplatives, each with his group, each with his community, each the teacher of his group, an honored leader, well-regarded by people at large — i.e., Purana Kassapa, Makkhali Gosala, Ajita Kesakambalin, Pakudha Kaccayana, Sañjaya Belatthaputta, and the Nigantha Nathaputta: Do they all have direct Knowledge as they themselves claim, or do they all not have direct Knowledge, or do some of them have direct Knowledge and some of them not?'

'Enough, Subhadda. Put this question aside. I will teach you the Dhamma. Listen, and pay close attention. I will speak.'

3T1.jpg

'Yes, Lord,' Subhadda answered, and the Blessed One said, 'In any Doctrine and discipline where the Noble Eightfold Path is not found, no contemplative of the first... second... third... fourth order (stream-winner, once-returner, non-returner, arahant ] is found. But in any Doctrine and discipline where the Noble Eightfold Path is found, contemplatives of the first... second... third... fourth order are found. The Noble Eightfold Path is found in this Doctrine and discipline, and right here there are contemplatives of the first... second... third... fourth order. Other teachings are empty of knowledgeable contemplatives. And if the monks dwell rightly, this World will not be empty of Arahants. At age twenty-nine I went forth, seeking what might be skillful, and since my going forth more than fifty years have past. Outside of the realm of methodical Dhamma, there is no contemplative.

And no contemplative of the second... third... fourth order. Other teachings are empty of knowledgeable contemplatives. And if the monks dwell rightly, this World will not be empty of Arahants.'

Then Subhadda the Wanderer said, 'Magnificent, Lord, magnificent! In many ways has the Blessed One made the Dhamma clear — just as if one were to place upright what has been overturned, to reveal what has been hidden, to point out the way to one who is lost, or to set out a lamp in the darkness so that those with eyes might see forms. I go to the Blessed One for Refuge, and to the Dhamma and to the community of monks. Let me obtain the going forth in the Blessed One's presence, let me obtain admission.'

'Anyone, Subhadda, who has previously belonged to another sect and who desires the going forth and admission in this Doctrine and discipline must first undergo probation for four months. If, at the end of four months, the monks feel so moved, they give him the going forth and admit him to the Monk's state. But I know distinctions among individuals in this matter.'

'Lord, if that is so, I am willing to undergo probation for four years. If, at the end of four years, the monks feel so moved, let them give me the going forth and admit me to the Monk's state.'

Then the Blessed One said to Ven. Ananda, 'Very well then, Ananda, give Subhadda the going forth.'

'Yes, Lord,' Ananda answered.

Then Subhadda said to Ven. Ananda, 'It is a gain for you, Ananda, a great gain, that you have been anointed here in the Teacher's presence with the pupil's anointing.'

Images-adi.jpg

Then Subhadda the Wanderer received the going forth and the admission in the Blessed One's presence. And not long after his admission — dwelling alone, secluded, heedful, ardent, and resolute — he in no long time reached and remained in the supreme goal of the holy Life, for which clansmen rightly go forth from home into homelessness, knowing and realizing it for himself in the here and now. He knew: 'Birth is ended, the holy Life fulfilled, the task done. There is nothing further for the sake of this World.' And thus Ven. Subhadda became another one of the Arahants, the last of the Blessed One's face-to-face disciples...

Then the Blessed One addressed the monks, 'I exhort you, monks: All processes are subject to decay. Bring about completion by being heedful.' Those were the Tathagata's last words.

Then the Blessed One entered the first Jhana. Emerging from that he entered the second. Emerging from that, he entered the third... the fourth... the dimension of the infinitude of space... the dimension of the infinitude of Consciousness... the dimension of nothingness... the dimension of neither Perception nor non-Perception... the cessation of Perception and feeling.

Then Ven. Ananda said to Ven. Anuruddha, "The Blessed One, sir, has entered total Unbinding."

"No, friend, the Blessed One has not entered total Unbinding. He has attained the cessation of Perception and feeling."

Then emerging from the cessation of Perception and feeling, the Blessed One entered the dimension of neither Perception nor non-Perception... the dimension of nothingness... the dimension of the infinitude of Consciousness... the dimension of the infinitude of space... the fourth Jhana... the third... the second... the first Jhana. Emerging from the first Jhana he entered the second... the third... the fourth Jhana. Emerging from the fourth Jhana, he entered total Unbinding in the interim...

When the Blessed One had attained total Unbinding, Sakka, ruler of the gods, uttered this stanza: How inconstant are compounded things! Their nature: to arise and pass away. They disband as they are arising. Their total stilling is bliss.

Source

www.accesstoinsight.org