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30 nissaggiyas

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1st part, cīvara

nissaggiya 1

"niṭṭhitacīvarasmiṃ bhikkhunā ubbhatasmiṃ kathine dasāhaparamaṃ atinekacīvaraṃ dhāretabbaṃ, taṃ atikkāmayato nissaggiaṃ pacittiaṃ."

Not to keep an extra robe more than ten days at a time. If a bhikkhu keeps his non-determined robe more than ten days, it entails a pācittiya and irremediably calls for the forfeiture of this robe. This robe must be momentarily handed over to another bhikkhu by means of an authoritative formula, and then the latter returns the robe. Then, the bhikkhu who has committed the nissaggiya must perform the desanā.

This only concerns the robes being worn, as old robes can be used as a curtain, a carpet, etc. Then a bhikkhu cannot determine a new robe as long as the determination of the old robe has not been overruled.

There are four exceptions according to which a bhikkhu can keep a non-determined robe more than ten days at a time:

This rule only concerns the robes being worn, because a bhikkhu could definitely own others that he uses as carpets, curtains, etc. The way to give up a robe nissaggiya 1

The bhikkhu who committed the fault of having kept an extra robe more than ten days at a time, must give up this robe nissaggiya before doing the desanā. The formula of this forfeiture can be uttered in pāḷi or in another language.

"idaṃ me bhante cīvaraṃ dasāhātikkantaṃ nissaggiyaṃ, imāhaṃ āyasmato nissajjāmi".

"Venerable, I must give up this robe that I have kept more than ten days. This robe, I leave it to you."

After having relinquished the robe, it is necessary to purge the pācittiya caused by the nissaggiya by means of desanā. Afterwards, the bhikkhu who receives the robe nissaggiya returns it to the bhikkhu who has committed the nissaggiya while uttering in pāḷi, or another language:

"imaṃ cīvaraṃ āyasmato dammi."

" This robe Venerable, I return it to you."

nissaggiya 2

"niṭṭhitacīvarasmiṃ bhikkhunā ubbhatasmiṃ kathine ekarattaṃpi ce bhikkhu ticīvarena vippavaseyya, aññatra bhikkhusammutiyā, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to spend the night far from one of his three robes. Once a bhikkhu has managed to finish the tailoring of his robe, if he does no longer and doesn't come

across any inauspicious conditions at vassa's time, and he is not sick, spending the night without one of the three determined robes, it entails a pācittiya and irremediably calls for the forfeiture of this robe. The way to give up a robe nissaggiya 2

The formula of this abandonment can be recited in pāḷi or in another language.

"idaṃ me bhante cīvaraṃ rattivippavutthaṃ aññatra bhikkhusammutiyā nissaggiyaṃ, māhaṃ āyasmato nissajjāmi."

"Venerable, I must give up this robe that I left far behind me overnight. This robe, I leave it to you."

If the bhikkhu thinks that he will spend dawn far from one of his three robes, he can recite the formula meant for eliminating the determination of this robe and so, be free from nissaggiya...

If it concerns the double robe:

"etaṃ saṃghāṭiṃ paccuddharāmi."

I abolish the determination of this second robe."

If concerns the upper robe:

"etaṃ uttatāsaṅgaṃ paccuddharāmi."

"I abolish the determination of the upper robe."

If it concerns the lower robe:

"etaṃ antaravāsakaṃ paccuddharāmi."

"I abolish the determination of this lower robe."

A bhikkhu who spends a night until dawn without one of his three robes can re-determine it

the day after. In this case, he does not commit the nissaggiya 2.

nissaggiya 3

"niṭṭhitacīvarasmiṃ bhikkhunā ubbhatasmiṃ kathine bhikkhuno paneva akālacīvaraṃ uppajjeyya, ākaṅkhamānena bhikkhunā paṭiggahetabbaṃ, paṭiggahetvā khippameva kāretabbaṃ, no ca' ssa pāripūri, māsaparamaṃ tena bhikkhunā taṃ cīvaraṃ nikkhipitabbaṃ ūnassa pārikapūriyā satiyā paccāsāya. tato ce uttari nikkhipeyya satiyāpi paccāsāya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to keep the clothing material meant for the tailoring of a robe more than one month at a time. If a bhikkhu succeeded in completing the tailoring of a new robe, if he does no longer or doesn't come across any inauspicious conditions during a vassa and if he is not sick, when some clothing materials are set apart and meant for a new robe, it must be sewed in the forthcoming ten days, (in accordance with the nissaggiya 1). If there is not enough clothing material and the bhikkhu is still expecting to receive some to finish this robe, the material can be kept for a month – a lunar month. If this period is exceeded, it entails a pācittiya and irremediably calls for the abandon of the unfinished robe. To purge this fault, it is advisable to give up the robe in the presence of another bhikkhu by means of the following formula in pāḷi or in another language:

"imaṃ me bhante akālacīvaraṃ māsātikkantaṃ nissaggiyaṃ, imāhaṃ āyasmato nissajjāmi."

"I must give up this robe "exceeding the allotted period" that I have kept more than a month. This robe Venerable, I leave it to you."

After having given up this robe, it is necessary to do the desanā to purify the pācittiya that is inherent to this fault.

Note: In today's world, given that the robes are already sewed (ready-made), the nissaggiya 3 has virtually no longer any chance to be committed.

nissaggiya 4

"yo pana bhikkhu aññātikāya bhikkhuniyā purāṇacīvaraṃ dhovāpeyya vā rajāpeyya vā ākoṭāpeyyavā, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to have a robe washed or dyed by a bhikkhunī who is not a relative. If a bhikkhu gets his "old" robe washed, dyed or dried through hitting by a bhikkhunī, who is not an offspring of his family up to the seventh generation, he commits a fault irremediably calling for the abandonment of his robe and entailing a pācittiya.

As soon as the robe has been worn or used as a pillow, it is considered as "old". The seven generations of the family

The seven generations of the family corresponds with his own generation, to the three who are backward and to the three subsequent ones after himself. Worth to come to know:

  • great-grand-parents,
  • grand-parents,
  • brothers and sisters,
  • children,
  • grand-children,
  • great grand-children.

nissaggiya 5

"yo pana bhikkhu aññātikāya bhikkhunīyā hatthato cīvaraṃ paṭiggahṇeyya aññatra pārivattakā, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to accept a robe from a bhikkhunī who is not a relative. If, this not being an exchange, a bhikkhu accepts a robe from the hands of a bhikkhunī who is not a relative of his, it irremediably calls for the abandon of the robe and entails a pācittiya.

A piece of clothing material is considered as a "robe" as soon as it has a width of a quarter of a yard - about 20 centimetres / 9 inches - and an cubit's length - about 50 centimetres / 19 inches. If a bhikkhu receives from a bhikkhunī a clothing material measuring at least these dimensions, under the agreement of an exchange even only with a myrobolan (symbolic, because it is only a valueless small fruit), no fault is being committed by accepting it.

nissaggiya 6

"yo pana bhikkhu aññātakaṃ gahapatiṃ vā gahapatāniṃ vā cīvaraṃ viññāpeyya aññtra samayā, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ. tatthāyaṃ samayo, acchinnacīnaro vā hoti bhikkhu naṭṭhacīvaro vā, ayaṃ tattha samayo."

Not to ask someone who is not a relative for a robe. If a bhikkhu asks for a robe from a dāyaka who is not a relative of his and he gets one, this irremediably calls for the abandonment of this robe and entails a pācittiya. However, in case the robe is stolen or destroyed, it is permissible to ask for one from anybody. Also, when a dāyaka has invited a bhikkhu to ask from him, the latter can freely inform him of the need for the robe.

Here is the formula which is appropriate to say - in pāḷi or in another language - in front of one or several bhikkhus, in order to proceed to the abandonment of the robe nissaggiya:

"idaṃ me bhante cīvaraṃ aññātakaṃ gahapatikaṃ aññatra samayā viññāpitaṃ nissaggiyaṃ, imāhaṃ saṃghassa imāhaṃ āyasmantānaṃ (āyasmato) nissajjāmi."

"Venerable(s), I must give up this robe that I asked from a dāyaka who is not a relative of mine. This robe, I leave it to the saṃgha, venerable(s)."

After having given up the robe, the fault must be purged by means of desanā.

By forcing a dāyaka, who invited him to ask for what he requires, to offer a robe or a material that he does not want to give, a bhikkhu commits the nissaggiya 6. In this case, depending on the value of the material and the way the offering has been forced, the pārājika 2 may be committed.

nissaggiya 7

"tañce aññātako gahapati vā gahapatānī vā bahūhi cīvarehi abhihaṭṭhu pavāreyya, santaruttaraharamaṃ tena bhikkhunā tato cīvaraṃ sāditabbaṃ, tato ce uttari sādiyeyya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to ask for more than one upper robe and one lower robe in case of loss of the three robes. If a bhikkhu whose robes were stolen or destroyed asks from a dāyaka who is not a relative of his, for one or several robes in addition to one for the upper part and one for the lower part of the body, or of dimensions exceeding these two robes, it irremediably calls for the abandonment of the robe or robes received in addition to those that he was authorised to ask for, and it entails a pācittiya.

If a bhikkhu is deprived of his robes, whether they have been hidden, destroyed by fire, taken away by waters, bitten by rats, etc., he can ask for others from the dāyaka (even among those who have not set such a proposal) who are not relatives of his. However, it is advisable to be offered two robes at the most: an upper and a lower robe. The bhikkhu who accepts a larger number of them commits the nissaggiya 7.

The bhikkhus who had their robes stolen, or else destroyed in one way or another, can ask for robes from a dāyaka who is not a relative of his without exceeding the maximum permitted:

  • If one robe has been lost, the bhikkhu cannot ask for a robe.
  • If two robes have been lost, only one robe can be asked for.
  • If three robes have been lost, at the most two robes can be asked for.

However, a bhikkhu who looses the only two robes that he possesses, can ask for two. It is also advisable to ask for more than two robes from a dāyaka who has previously expressed the request to ask him in case it was needed (robes or objects pertaining to the four requisites), and also from his relatives up to the seventh generation (please refer to the list in nissaggiya 4).

nissaggiya 8

"bhikkhuṃ paneva uddissa aññātakassa gahapatissa vā gahapatāniyā vā cīvaracetāpannaṃ upakkhaṭaṃ hoti "iminā cīvaracetāpannena vīvaraṃ cetāpetvā itthannāmaṃ bhikkhuṃ cīvarena acchādessāmī" ti, tatra ceso bhikkhu pubbe appavārito upasaṅkamitvā cīvare vikappaṃ āpajjeyya "sādhu vata maṃ āyasmā iminā cīvaracetāpannena evarūpaṃ vā evarūpaṃ vā cīvaraṃ cetāpetvā acchādehī" ti kalyāṇakamyataṃ upādāya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ"

Not to ask for a good quality robe from a dāyaka who is saving money to offer one. If a bhikkhu asks for a robe of good quality from a dāyaka - who is not a relative of his, the latter having not expressed, to the former, the request to be asked for it, - who saves money to offer him one and this good quality robe costs more than the one supposed to be offered at first, that he asks him to exchange the robe that is meant to be offered or else to buy another, that he specifies the width or the length, that he asks for one that has a softer touch or else he specifies other features and if he gets the robe according to his wishes, it irremediably calls for the abandonment of this robe and entails a pācittiya.

If the value of the robe being purchased according to the specific request of the bhikkhu doesn't exceed the value of the one meant at first, the nissaggiya 8 is not being committed.

nissaggiya 9

"bhikkhuṃ paneva uddissa ubhinnaṃ aññātakānaṃ gahapatīnaṃ vā gahapatānīnaṃ vā paccekacīvaracetāpannāni upakkhaṭāni honti "imehi mayaṃ paccekacīvaracetāpannehi paccekacīvarāni cetāpetvā itthannāmaṃ bhikkhuṃ cīvarehi acchādessāmā" ti, tatra ceso bhikkhu pubbe appavārito upasaṅkamitvā cīvare vikappaṃ āpajjeyya "sādhu vata maṃ āyasmanto imehi paccekacīvaracetāpannehi evarūpaṃ vā evarūpaṃ vā vīvaraṃ cetāpetvā acchādetha ubhāva santā ekenā" ti kalyāṇakamyataṃ upādāya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to ask for a good quality robe from two dāyakas who are saving money to offer one each. If a bhikkhu proceeds to the house of one of the two dāyakas - none of them being relatives of his - the latter both willing to offer a robe, and this former having not been requested to do so asks them to get together to offer him a robe worth more that one of the two robes that these dāyakas had thought to offer at first, by imposing specifications as to the robe's width or length, if he gets offered this robe the way he asked for, he is obliged to relinquish it and in entails a pācittiya.

nissaggiya 10

"bhikkhuṃ paneva uddissa rājā vā rājabhoggo vā brāhmaṇo vā gahapatiko vā dūtena cīvaracetāpannaṃ pahiṇeyya "iminā cīvaracetāpannena cīvaraṃ cetāpetvā itthannāmaṃ bhikkhuṃ cīvarena acchādehī" ti. so ce dūto taṃ bhikkhuṃ upasaṅkamitvā evaṃ vadeyya "idaṃ kho bhante āyasmantaṃ uddissa cīvaracetāpannaṃ ābhataṃ, paṭiggahṇātu āyasmā cīvaracetāpannaṃ" nti. tena bhikkhunā so dūto evamassa vacanīyo "na kho mayaṃ āvuso cīvaracetāpannaṃ paṭiggahṇāma, cīvarañca kho mayaṃ paṭiggahṇāma kālena kappiya" nti. so ce dūto taṃ bhikkhuṃ evaṃ vadeyya "atthi panāyasmato koci veyyāvaccakaro" ti. cīvaratthikena bhikkhunā veyyāvaccakaro niddisitabbo ārāmiko vā upāsako vā "eso kho āvuso bhikkhūnaṃ veyyavaccakaro" ti. so ce dūto taṃ veyyavaccakaraṃ saññāpetvā taṃ bhikkhuṃ upasaṇkamitvā evaṃ vadeyya "yaṃ kho bhante āyasmā veyyāvaccakaraṃ niddisi, saññatto so mayā, upasaṅkamatuāyasmā kālena, cīvarena taṃ acchādessatī. cīvaratthikena bhikkhave bhikkhunā veyyāvaccakaro upasakaṅkamitvā dvattikkhattuṃ codetabbo sāretabbo" attho me āvuso cīvarenā" ti, dvattikkhattuṃ codayamāno sārayamāno taṃ cīvaraṃ abhinipphādeyya, iccetaṃ kusalaṃ, no ce abhinipphādeyya, catukkhattuṃ pañcakkhattuṃ chakkhattuparamaṃ tuhṇībhūtena uddissa ṭhātabbaṃ, catukkhattuṃ pañcakkhattuṃ chakkhattuparamaṃ tuhṇībūto uddissa tiṭṭhamāno taṃ cīvaraṃ abhinipphādeyya, iccetaṃ kusalaṃ, tato ce uttari vāyāmamāno taṃ cīvaraṃ abhinipphādeyya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ. no ce abhinipphādeyya, yatassa cīvaracetāpannaṃ ātataṃ, tattha sāmaṃ vā gantabbaṃ, dūto vā pāhetabbo "yaṃ kho tuhme āyasmanto bhikkhuṃ uddissa cīvaracetāpannaṃ pahiṇittha, na taṃ tassa bhikkhuno kiñci atthaṃ anubhoti, yuñjantāyasmanto sakaṃ, mā vo sakaṃ vinassā" ti, ayaṃ sattha sāmīci."

Not to appoint a kappiya on his own, nor to be too pushy with a kappiya who is supposed to provide something. If a person willing to offer a robe to a bhikkhu, sends an emissary to hand over money to the said bhikkhu, and his emissary asks him to accept it explaining that it is meant for a robe, this bhikkhu must reply to him: "I do not accept money. I can only accept a robe."

This emissary can then say to the bhikkhu: "Venerable, I will refer the matter to a kappiya." This bhikkhu can appoint a kappiya to this emissary only if he is requested to do so or if he already has one.

The emissary proceeds to the kappiya and hands him over money saying: "Friend, this sum that I am giving you is meant to buy a robe for this particular bhikkhu", naming the bhikkhu referred to.

Once this emissary has been understood by the kappiya, he proceeds back to the bhikkhu by informing him: "Venerable, I made the said kappiya understand clearly what is meant; at the required time, you could go to him so as to get a robe."

By approaching a kappiya, this bhikkhu could tell him at the most: "I need a robe." He can repeatedly ask him so twice or thrice. After these reminders, if the robe is still not obtained, he could show up before this kappiya up to six times by remaining standing and silent. If at the end of the three oral utterances and having stood silent six times, the robe is not still not obtained, if this bhikkhu says or does anything else to get this robe and he finally gets it, it irremediably calls for the abandonment of the robe and entails a pācittiya.

If the bhikkhu has not succeeded in getting a robe - after three oral utterances have been made and having stood in silence six times -, it is advisable that he himself goes to the person wishing to offer the robe or sends an emissary to carry his message: "dāyaka, the money meant for this robe has been entrusted. Such-and-such bhikkhu didn't receive anything. dāyaka, please get your money back to make sure that you have not lost it."

The vinaya applies this rule in the same way regarding offerings of other kinds such as exercise books, food, medicine, lodging, etc.

2nd part, kosiya

nissaggiya 11

"yo pana bhikkhu kosiyamissakaṃ santhataṃ kārāpeyya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to accept carpets containing silk. If a bhikkhu is being offered a floor carpet made out of silk, he must relinquish it and it entails a pācittiya. Even if such a carpet does not contain one thread of silk, the nissaggiya 11 is being committed. However, by using silken material such as an anti-dust cloth, a curtain, a floor cover or a pillow, no fault is being committed.

Note: These types of carpets are hardly used nowadays. Not to be mistaken with the piece of square material used to cover floors (nissīdana).

nissaggiya 12

"yo pana bhikkhu suddhakāḷakānaṃ eḷakalomānaṃ santhataṃ kārāpeyya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to accept the floor carpets only made of black sheep wool. If a bhikkhu sews or causes someone else to offer him a floor carpet only made of black sheep wool – which is devoid of any other colours –, he cannot use it and must forsake it, and it entails a pācittiya.

nissaggiya 13

"navaṃ pana bhikkhunā santhataṃ kārayamānena dvebhāgā suddhakāḷakānaṃ eḷakalomānaṃ ādātabbā tatiyaṃ odātānaṃ catutthaṃ gocariyānaṃ. anādā ce bhikkhu dve bhāge suddhakāḷakānaṃ eḷakakomānaṃ tatiyaṃ odātānaṃ catutthaṃ gocariyānaṃ navaṃ santhataṃ kārāpeyya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to accept a floor carpet that is, for more than half of it, made with black sheep wool and a quarter in white wool. A bhikkhu who makes or causes someone else to offer him a floor carpet can utilise plain black sheep wool. However, he can do it for half of the carpet at the most. He must incorporate white sheep wool for at least a quarter of the carpet as well as a wool or another colour, according to his wishes, for at least a quarter of the carpet.

If a bhikkhu purchases a floor carpet and does not respect its proportions, he commits a fault irremediably calling for the definitive abandonment of this carpet and entails a pācittiya.

nissaggiya 14

"navaṃ pana bhikkhunā santhataṃ kārāpetvā chabbassāni dhāretabbaṃ, orena ce channaṃ vassānaṃ taṃ santhataṃ vissajjetvā vā avissajjetvā vā aññaṃ navaṃ santhataṃ kārāpeyya aññatra bhikkhusammutiyā, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to get another floor carpet as long as the former is not six years old yet. A bhikkhu who makes or causes someone else to make him a new floor carpet must keep it for six years before getting a new one. If during these six years he gets another, this new carpet must be given up, he cannot get it back and the bhikkhu commits a pācittiya.

To a bhikkhu undergoing stages of bad health, who cannot take his floor carpet along with him when he is travelling, it is allowed to get a new one from the saṃgha during the six years period. Although it is forbidden to make or to ask for a floor carpet during this six years period, it is allowed to make one for another bhikkhu. It is also allowed to accept one during this period if someone spontaneously offers one or if the old one is lost or no longer in a good shape.

nissaggiya 15

"nisīdanasanthataṃ pana bhikkhunā kārayamānena purāṇasantha tassa sāmanthā sugatavidatthi ādātabbā dubbaṇṇakaraṇāya, anādā ce bhikkhu purāṇasantha tassa sāmantā sugatanidatthiṃ navaṃ nisīdanasanthataṃ kārāpeyya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to make a new carpet without adding a part of the old one. If a bhikkhu makes a new floor carpet without incorporating into it a portion of the margin of the old one (it should at least measure the minimum dimension of Buddha's measurement, approximately 60 centimetres / 16.5 inches), he must give up this carpet, which in no wise can be utilised and commits a pācittiya.

Concerning the portion that one should take from the old floor carpet so as to incorporate it into the new one, if the remaining piece worthy of use measures less than a quarter yard – 9 inches – 22 centimetres, most of it must be got back. If there is nothing to be reutilised from the old floor carpet, the bhikkhu can then make a new floor carpet without adding any piece from the old one.

If the old floor carpet is still in a good shape, it is also possible (rather than making entirely another carpet) to add wool so as to complete it.

nissaggiya 16

"bhikkhuno paneva addhānamaggapaṭi pannassa eḷakalomāni uppajjeyyuṃ, ākaṅkhamānena bhikkhunā paṭiggahetabbāni. paṭiggahetvā tiyojanaparamaṃ sahatthā haritabbāni asante hārake. tato ce uttari tareyya asantepi hārake, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to carry wool along with oneself for more than three walking days. If a bhikkhu who needs sheep wool has no one to carry it for him on a distance exceeding the one corresponding to three walking days, this wool must be abandoned and it entails a pācittiya.

nissaggiya 17

"yo pana bhikkhu aññātikāya bhikkhunīyā eḷakalomāni dhovāpeyya vā rajāpeyya vā vijaṭāpeyya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to make someone else wash, dye or card the wool for a bhikkhunī. If a bhikkhu causes wool to be washed, dyed or carded by a bhikkhunī who is not a relative of his, he must abandon this wool and it entails a pācittiya.

nissaggiya 18

"yo pana bhikkhu jātarūparajataṃ uggahṇeyya vā uggahṇāpeyya vā upanikkhittaṃ vā sādiyeyya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to accept money. If a bhikkhu accepts or receives in one way or another, gold or money, it must immediately be relinquished and it entails a pācittiya.

What ought to be considered as gold or money are: all precious metals, coins, bank notes, checks, credit cards, restaurant tickets or any other type of monetary means (all that which enables to buy something). However, telephone cards, stamps and transportation tickets do not belong to this category as these things do not enable one to do shopping.

To proceed in the forfeiture of gold or money, all the bhikkhus of the vihāra meet in the sīmā and appoint a bhikkhu - renowned for his honesty - who will go and throw this gold or money outside of the monastery without bothering to take note of the spot where it falls, or even informing anyone whosoever of the spot where he went to throw it (in the case of a check book or a credit card, it must be given back to the bank). This gold or money that was not worthy to be accepted can be eventually handed over to the persons in charge of the monastery or to the association that administers it, but in no way to a kappiya.

Note: This rule corresponds partly with the last of the ten precepts.

nissaggiya 19

"yo pana bhikkhu nānappakārakaṃ rūpiyasaṃvohāraṃ samāpajjeyya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to use money. If a bhikkhu uses gold or money or other monetary means to proceed in the exchange of anything whatsoever, he must abandon all that which was thus obtained and it entails a pācittiya.

Note: This rule corresponds partly to the last part of the ten precepts.

nissaggiya 20

"yo pana bhikkhu nānappakārakaṃ samāpajjeyya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to exchange things. If a bhikkhu proceeds in an exchange, to a purchase or a sale (by means of any materials whatsoever), the object purchased in this way must be abandoned and it entails a pācittiya.

However, he can proceed in this exchange with other bhikkhus, bhikkhunīs and sāmaṇeras (only if this is done to help one another and not to engage in business).

3rd part, patta

nissaggiya 21

"dasāhaparamaṃ atirekapatto dhāretabbo. taṃatikkāmayato nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to keep an extra bowl more than ten days at a time. If a bhikkhu, during a period exceeding ten days, keeps a bowl, in addition to the one that he determined as his bowl, this extra bowl must be relinquished and it entails a pācittiya.

Without determining and abandoning it, an extra bowl can be kept only ten days at the most. Beyond that limit, it must be relinquished to another bhikkhu. In this case, the bhikkhu utters this formula:

"ayaṃ me bhante patto dasāhātikkanto nissaggiyo, imāhaṃ āyasmato nissajjāmi."

"This extra bowl that I kept more than ten days must be relinquished. Venerable, this bowl, I abandon it to you."

Once this relinquishment is done, the bhikkhu, while accepting the bowl, must remit back to the guilty bhikkhu, who should either determine this bowl, or else definitely abandon it to another bhikkhu.

nissaggiya 22

"yo pana bhikkhu ūnapañcabandhanena pattena aññaṃ navaṃ pattaṃ cetāpeyya, nissaggiyaṃ, tena bhikkhunā so patto bhikkhuparisāya nissajjitabbo. yo ca tassā bhikkhuno padātabbo "ayaṃ te bhikkhu patto yāva bhedanāya dharetabbo" ti, ayaṃ tattha sāmīcī."

Not to ask for a new bowl as long as the present one does not have at least five cracks or has not become unusable. If a bhikkhu asks – and receives – a new bowl, while the previous doesn't have at least five cracks or fissures, or hasn't become unusable yet, it must be relinquished and it entails a pācittiya. This bowl must be relinquished to the saṃgha (all the bhikkhus of the monastery) by remitting it to the eldest among the brethren. In turn, the eldest remits one of his bowls to the second bhikkhu (in rank of seniority) who will remit one to the next and so on. The worst bowl – which is extra to all others – must be remitted to this guilty bhikkhu who will have to utilise it until it breaks. He must also relinquish his original bowl. To give up the new bowl, the guilty bhikkhu will say:

"imaṃ me bhante patto ūnapaṅca bandhanena pattena cetāpito nissaggiyo, imāhaṃ saṃghāssa nissajjāmi."

"Venerable, it is convenient that I give up this bowl that I asked for, knowing that mine doesn't bear five cracks yet. This bowl, I leave it to the saṃgha."

Once this bowl has been abandoned, the bhikkhu must purify the pācittiya by doing the desanā.

If the crack of an earthen bowl has a length measuring at least two phalanxes, a small hole must be punctured on each side so that a string, being utilised as fixation, could pass through. If the bowl does not have at least ten phalanxes, a new bowl cannot be claimed. If there are holes where food can be stuck in, they must be sealed with graphite or resin. If a grain of semolina can pass through a hole, the determination of the bowl is abolished; it means that the bowl can no longer be considered as such. And so, if a hole is enlarged, it must be sealed with the help of a sheet, or an iron filing, etc.

Naturally, a bhikkhu can accept a supplementary bowl if a dāyaka offers it to him spontaneously, even if the present bowl is still in good shape.

nissaggiya 23

"yāni kho pana tāni gilānānaṃ bhikkhūnaṃ paṭisāya nīyāni bhesajjāni, seyyathidaṃ, sappi navanītaṃ telaṃ madhu phāṇitaṃ, tāni taṭiggahetvā sattāharamaṃ sannidhikārakaṃ paribuñjitabbāni. taṃ atikkāmayato nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to keep medicinal foods more than seven days at a time. If a bhikkhu undergoing a stage of bad health, who is allowed to store and use medicinal foods such as butter, fat, oil, honey, molasses or sugar for a period of seven days at the most, consumes one of these stored foods after this period, the product must be forsaken and it entails a pācittiya.

These medicinal foods must be accepted within the limits of what can be consumed during a period of seven days. If these medicinal foods cannot be totally consumed during this period, before the seven days have expired, the bhikkhu must make a determination by saying: "I will eat - or drink - no more of this product." If this (or these) food (s) is not absorbed but only smeared, it can be stored beyond seven days. It is improper to consume these foods if it is only due to hunger or to simply satisfy a desire (gluttony). These medicinal foods are only permitted in the following cases: lack of energy, weakness, illness due to winds circulating in the body and other health problems of this kind. A bhikkhu suffering these health problems is free to use these products at any moment of the day or night.

Among the five types of medicinal foods, those that are consumed must be filtered prior to it, to make sure that they do not contain any solid particles. Nowadays, apart from sugar cane, all that is extracted from sugar such as palm juice, cubes of palm sugar and molasses of palm (usually in the shape of irregular balls) also belong to the category of honeys, sugars and molasses. Sick bhikkhus are allowed to use sugar cubes and hard molasses. As to the bhikkhus who do not have health problems, in case of hunger, they are allowed to consume sugars or molasses in the afternoons,. However they can do it only in liquid form.

A healthy bhikkhu must give up this type of liquid the same day and cannot accept solids in the afternoon. At the end of the seven days, an unhealthy bhikkhu must abandon and get someone to re-offer him these products if he needs to be able to consume them for another seven days.

nissaggiya 24

" " māso saso gihmāna" nti bhikkhunā vassikasāṭikacīvaraṃ pariyesitabbaṃ, "addhamāso seso gihmāna" nti katvā nivāsetabbaṃ. orenace "māso seso gihmāna" nti vassikasāṭidacīvaraṃ pariyeseyya, ore "na ddhamāso seso gihmāna" nti katvā nivāseyya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to get a bath robe, sewed, dyed or brought before the full moon. If a bhikkhu searches for a material to make a "bath robe" between the full moons of October and May, if he sews or dyes a "bath robe" between the full moons of October and June, or if he determines or wears one between the full moons of October and July, he must abandon this robe and it entails a pācittiya.

A "bath robe" is a material worn by a bhikkhu while taking his shower under the rain (during the monsoon, between June and October).

The bathrobe nissaggiya must be relinquished to the saṃgha, or to a group of bhikkhus, or to a single bhikkhu. Afterwards, the pācittiya must be purged by means of desanā. Here is the formula that must be pronounced either in pāḷi, or else in another language, when the "bath robe" is abandoned.

"idaṃ me bhante vissikasāṭikacīvaraṃ atirekamāse sese gihmānepariyiṭṭhaṃ, atirekaddhamāse sese gihmāne katvā paridahitaṃ nissaggiyaṃ, imāhaṃ saṃghāssa nissajjāmi."

"Venerable(s), I must abandon this bathrobe that I searched for and obtained outside the five authorised months / which I sew, dyed, wore beyond the four authorised months. This robe, I leave to you."

Afterwards, the bhikkhu must abandon this robe.

nissaggiya 25

"yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhusa sāmaṃ cīvaraṃ datvā kupito anattamano acchindeyya vā acchindāpeyya vā, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to take back a robe after having offered it. If a bhikkhu, after having offered a robe to another bhikkhu, out of anger, or else out of annoyance, takes back this robe or causes someone else to take it back, this robe must be forsaken and it entails a pācittiya.

A bhikkhu who takes back a robe that he has offered to another bhikkhu, while considering it belongs to him, commits the nissaggiya 25. If the first bhikkhu takes back something that he gave to a second bhikkhu and the latter knows that this thing was given to him, depending on the value of the object, the first bhikkhu may commit the pārājika 2. In all cases, the robe must be given back to its owner.

nissaggiya 26

"yo pana bhikkhu sāmaṃ suttaṃ viññāpetvā tantavāyehi cīvaraṃ vāyāpeyya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to get the robe woven. If whilst asking for thread, a bhikkhu gets a robe woven and he receives it, he must abandon it and it entails a pācittiya.

A bhikkhu must not ask for a large quantity of thread from a person who is not a relative of his or who has not invited him to tell what he needed. If a bhikkhu causes one of these persons to get a robe woven by a weaver, he commits the nissaggiya 26.

nissaggiya 27

"bhikkhuṃ paneva uddissa aññātako gahapati vā gahapatānī vā tantavāyehi cīvaraṃ vāyāpeyya, tatra ceso bhikkhu pubbe appavārito tantavāye upasaṅamitvā cīvare viappaṃ āpajjeyya "idaṃ kho āvuso cīvaraṃ maṃ uddissa viyyati, āyatañca karotha vitthatañca appitañca suvītañca suppavāyitañca suvilekhitañca suvitacchitañca karothi, appeva nāma mayampi āyasmantānaṃ kiñcimattaṃ anupadajjeyyāmā" ti. evañca so bhikkhu vatvā kiñimattaṃ anupadajjeyya antamaso piṇḍapātampi, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to ask for a robe to be woven bigger and of better quality than the one that the donor had planned to give. If, after a dāyaka has requested a weaver to weave a robe for a bhikkhu who is not a relative of his, without being requested to do so, the latter proceeds to a weaver to give him instructions so that the woven robe is of better quality than the one that the donor has planned to give, and according to these instructions, the weaver makes it larger; or else thicker; of better quality; regular and flat; or he spreads the material or dyes the thread well, if he gets this robe woven according to his wish, it irremediably calls for its forfeiture, and it entails a pācittiya.

nissaggiya 28

"dasāhānāgataṃ kattikatemāsikapuṇṇamaṃ bhikkhuno paneva accekacīvaraṃ uppajjeyya, accekaṃ maññamānena bhikkhunā paṭiggahetabbaṃ. paṭiggahetvā yāva cīvarakālasamayaṃ nikkhipitabbaṃ. tato ce uttari nikkhipeyya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to accept any extra robe – offered or not out of emergency – beyond the authorised period. If a bhikkhu accepts an extra robe that is offered or not because of an emergency, and he keeps it beyond the authorised period (refer to nissaggiya 3), it must be relinquished and it entails a pācittiya.

As an exception, a bhikkhu can accept an extra robe as soon as ten days before the end of the vassa, in case of emergency. A robe that is offered urgently is a robe offered by: a person who must leave on a trip; a pregnant woman; a sick person or a person whose faith in the dhamma suddenly arises. This donor can then invite the bhikkhu so as to offer him, or can himself go to the bhikkhu, and tell him: " vassāvāsikaṃ dassāmi." In English: "I offer you this robe of vassa." In these conditions (of emergency), the bhikkhus are authorised to accept a robe. If this robe is accepted before the kathina, it can be stored as a supplementary robe until the full moon of November (or beginning of December), that is to say, a month before the end of vassa. If this robe is accepted after the kathina, without determination, it can be stored during five months starting from the end of the vassa. If it is kept beyond the maximum authorised period, in both cases, it entails the nissaggiya 28.

nissaggiya 29

"upavassaṃ kho pana kattikapuṇṇamaṃ yāni kho pana tāni āraññakāni senāsanāni sākaṅkasammatāni sappaṭibhayāni, tathārūpesu bhikkhu senāsanesu viharanto ākaṅkhāno tiṇṇaṃ cīvarānaṃ aññataraṃ cīvaraṃ antaraghare nikkhipeyya, siyā ca tassa bhikkhuno kocideva paccayo tena cīvarena vippavāsāya, chārattaparamaṃ tena bhikkhunā tena cīvarena vippavasitabbaṃ. tato ce uttari vippavaseyya aññatra bhikkhu sammutiyā, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to leave one of the robes more than six nights in a village, at the end of the vassa period, while lodging in a dangerous area. If, during the kathina, a bhikkhu who is not sick, leaves one of his robes in a village for more than six nights, this robe must be abandoned and it entails a pācittiya.

During the kathina, if a bhikkhu living in a forest monastery fears a danger, he can leave one of his robes in a village for a period of six nights (at the most).

According to this rule, four conditions must be fulfilled to be permitted to leave a robe in a village:

  1. The bhikkhu has completed his vassa.
  2. The period – of the deposit of the robe – takes place during the kathina.
  3. The dwelling of the bhikkhu is located at least two thousand cubit lengths – approximately a kilometre/ (0.62 miles) – from the village.
  4. The bhikkhu fears to lose his robe.

nissaggiya 30

"yo pana bhikkhu jānaṃ saṃghikaṃ lābhaṃ pariṇataṃ attāno pariṇāmeyya, nissaggiyaṃ pācittiyaṃ."

Not to divert for his own benefit a donation made to the saṃgha. If, coming to know - by means of gestures or speech - that some things were meant to be offered to the saṃgha, a bhikkhu succeeds in getting them diverted to him for his own benefit, these things must be forsaken and it entails a pācittiya.

This rule specifies that even a bhikkhu who accepts things that his mother meant to offer to the saṃgha, after having influenced her to divert them to him, commits the nissaggiya 30.

Source

en.dhammadana.org