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Mutik Tsenpo

From Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia
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 Mutik Tsenpo or Murug Tsenpo (Tibetan: མུ་ཏིག་བཙན་པོ་, Wylie: Mu-tig btsan-po; Mu-rug-brtsan) is sometimes considered to have been one of the emperors of Tibet. This is, however, very questionable. Moreover, the whole period between the reigns of Trisong Detsen and Sadnalegs is very unclear, with several conflicting reports.

Trisong Detsen is said to have had four sons: Mutri Tsenpo, Muné Tsenpo, Mutik Tsenpo, and Sadnalegs. The eldest son, Mutri Tsenpo, died early.

Muné Tsenpo is said to have taken power when his father, Trisong Detsen retired (probably around 797 CE). After a short reign, Muné Tsenpo, was supposedly poisoned on the orders of his mother, Tsephongsa, who was jealous of his beautiful young wife, Queen Phoyongsa. After his death, Mutik Tsenpo was next in line to the throne.

Several sources, however, claim that Mutik Tsenpo murdered a senior minister and was exiled to Lhodak Kharchu (lHo-brag or Lhodrag), near the Bhutanese border in the south, so the throne was taken by Sadnalegs instead.[1][2]

Some sources say that Mutik Tsenpo was later killed by members of sNa-nam clan, but this couldn't have happened until after Sadnalegs became king, as Sadnalegs mentions in an inscription atZhwa'i-lha-khang that he took power from his father, that one of his brothers had died, and that he bound his elder brother, Mur-rug-brtsan, with an oath.[

Mutik Tsenpo (Wyl. mu tig btsan po) — one of the three (or four?) sons of King Trisong Detsen, born to Queen Droza Changchub, and a disciple of Padmasambhava. He later became known as Tridé Songtsen (Wyl. khri lde srong btsan) or Senalek (Wyl. sad na legs) and succeeded to Mune Tsenpo as King of Tibet. He reigned for approximately ten years (from 804 to 814 or 817) and further encouraged the propagation of the Buddhist teachings in Tibet. He had five sons, of whom Tri Ralpachen and Langdarma both reigned as kings of Tibet. His second son, Gyalsé Lharjé, was the immediate incarnation of his father, Trisong Detsen.

Source

Wikipedia:Mutik Tsenpo