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Heart Sutra

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Heart Sutra (Skt. prajñāpāramitā hṛdaya; Tib. ཤེས་རབ་ཀྱི་ཕ་རོལ་ཏུ་ཕྱིན་པའི་སྙིང་པོ་, Wyl. shes rab kyi pha rol tu phyin pa'i snying po), aka The Twenty-Five Verses on the Perfection of Wisdom — the most popular sutra of the prajñaparamita collection and indeed of the mahayana as a whole.

Although the sutra primarily consists of a dialogue between Shariputra and the great bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara, their words are inspired by the blessings of the Buddha, who remains absorbed in samadhi meditation until the end of the discussion. As with all the prajñaparamita sutras, the teaching took place at Vulture's Peak near Rajagriha.

It was first translated into Tibetan by Vimalamitra and Rinchen Dé. The translation was later revised by Gewé Lodrö, Namkha and others.


Related to the Five Paths

In the various commentaries, there are different explanations as to how the sutra can be related to the five paths.


Mantra

The sutra includes the mantra: tadyatha om gate gate paragate parasamgate bodhi svaha]] (tadyathā oṃ gate gate pāragate pārasaṃgate bodhi svāhā).

Atisha explained that the mantra encapsulates the entire teaching of the Heart Sutra for the benefit of those of the sharpest faculties.[1]


Dokpa

The Heart Sutra is often recited together with a supplemental section for dokpa, the practice of averting harm and negativity. The text of the dokpa section refers to an incident recounted in the Perfection of Wisdom Sutra in Eight Thousand Lines and Perfection of Wisdom Sutra in Eighteen Thousand Lines, when the god Indra turned away Mara and his forces, who were approaching the Buddha, by contemplating and reciting the Prajnaparamita.[2]


Commentaries

Indian


Tibetan

ཤེར་སྙིང་གི་ཚིག་འགྲེལ་, sher snying gi tshig 'grel


English

  • Sonam Rinchen, Geshe, The Heart Sutra, translated and edited by Ruth Sonam (Ithaca: Snow Lion, 2003)


Translations


Famous Quotations

Quotations: Heart Sutra


Notes

  1. Lopez (1996), p.170
  2. Lopez (1996) pp.223-4

Teachings on the Heart Sutra Given to the Rigpa Sangha


Further Reading


Internal Links


External Links

Source

RigpaWiki:Heart Sutra