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Ariyaka script

From Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia
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The Ariyaka script was created by King Rama IV of Siam in 1833 for use with the Pali language. He established a printing press for the script at Boworniwetsawiharn Temple in Bangkok, and had a small number of texts printed. Some correspondence with Sri Lankan monks was undertaken in the script. There was also a cursive (hand-written) version, but sources are very unclear in the details . Ian James developed a highly modified modern Latin font, without complicated vowel placement or diacritics, and with shapes based on those of ancient Brahmi and Pallava, which were the ancestors of the Indic scripts. It was named Akkhara Muni, (Letters of the Sage).

In Sri Lanka, Pali was used not only for the writing of Buddhist scriptures, but also to record the history of the country. The first chronicle of the country was Dipawamsa, which was written about the 4th century, followed by the Mahavamsa, Thupavamsa and Culavamsa.

The Bhesajjakkhandaka of the Vinaya-Pitaka was probably the first text written in Pali to deal with medicine. Bhesajjamanjusa, which was written during the reign of Parakramabahu I, (A D 1153-1186) was another. Pali literature include poetic creations like Thera and Theri Gata. Pali can be used in conversation even today, as it is primarily an oral language, and is used at international Pali conferences. Pali also can be written in any script used presently in different countries.

Source

www.skyknowledge.com